Herman Melville – Poesie, trad. di Emilio Capaccio

Herman Melville ca.1860La battaglia di tutte le battaglie

è scrivere.

.

H. M.

.

.

.

 

 

 

NOI PESCI

.

.

Noi pesci, noi pesci, allegramente nuotiamo,

Senza badare al compagno o al nemico.

Le nostre pinne sono forti,

Le nostre code sono fuori,

Mentre per i mari andiamo.

.

Pesci, pesci, siamo pesci con branchie rosse;

Nulla ci turba e freddo è il nostro sangue:

Siamo ottimisti per i nostri guai,

Che a esser branco ogni pesce è eroe.

Non badiamo a cosa sia questa vita

Che seguiamo, questo fantasma sconosciuto;

Incredibilmente bello è nuotare, —

Così nuotiamo lontano, facendo la schiuma.

Questa strana cosa intorno a noi,

Non per salvarci fuggiamo al suo fianco: —

È così ambigua la sua ombra, tutto qui —

Notiamo soltanto dal suo lato di sottovento.

E quanto alle anguille là sopra,

E quanto agli uccelli nell’aria,

Non ci curiamo di loro né delle loro rotte,

Mentre andiamo gioiosamente lontano!

.

Noi pesci, noi pesci, allegramente nuotiamo,

Senza badare al compagno o al nemico.

Le nostre pinne sono forti,

Le nostre code sono fuori,

Mentre per i mari andiamo.

.

.

.

WE FISH

.

.

We fish, we fish, we merrily swim,

We care not for friend nor for foe.

Our fins are stout,

Our tails are out,

As through the seas we go.

.

Fish, Fish, we are fish with red gills;

Naught disturbs us, our blood is at zero:

We are buoyant because of our bags,

Being many, each fish is a hero.

We care not what is it, this life

That we follow, this phantom unknown;

To swim, it’s exceedingly pleasant —

So swim away, making a foam.

This strange looking thing by our side,

Not for safety, around it we flee: —

Its shadow’s so shady, that’s all —

We only swim under its lee.

And as for the eels there above,

And as for the fowls of the air,

We care not for them nor their ways,

As we cheerily glide afar!

.

We fish, we fish, we merrily swim,

We care not for friend nor for foe:

Our fins are stout,

Our tails are out,

As through the seas we go.

.

.

.

TREMORI

.

.

Quando le nubi dell’oceano s’allungano sulle colline

Dell’entroterra infuriando nel bruno autunno inoltrato,

E l’orrore empie la valle infracidita,

E la guglia cade sfracellandosi nel villaggio,

Io medito sui mali della mia gente —

La tempesta che scoppia dalla devastazione del tempo

Sulla speranza più chiara del mondo

S’è unita al crimine più spregevole dell’uomo.

Ora del lato oscuro della natura bisogna tener conto —

(Ah! scoraggiato il buon umore è volato via)

Una creatura può leggere là avanti il ciglio imbronciato

D’una nera montagna solitaria.

Con grida i torrenti cadono giù per le gole,

E i temporali si formano dietro il temporale che sentiamo:

L’abete scricchiola nel travicello, la quercia nella chiglia di prua.

.

.

.

MISGIVINGS

.

.

When ocean-clouds over inland hills

Sweep storming in late autumn brown,

And horror the sodden valley fills,

And the spire falls crashing in the town,

I muse upon my country’s ills —

The tempest bursting from the waste of Time

On the world’s fairest hope linked with man’s foulest crime.

Nature’s dark side is heeded now —

(Ah! optimist-cheer disheartened flown) —

A child may read the moody brow

Of yon black mountain lone.

With shouts the torrents down the gorges go,

And storms are formed behind the storm we feel:

The hemlock shakes in the rafter, the oak in the driving keel.

.

.

.

CANTO FUNEBRE

.

.

Caliamo il nostro morto in mare,

Lo smisurato, smisurato mare;

Ogni bolla un sospiro vano,

Mentre affonda per sempre sissignore.

.

Caliamo il nostro morto in mare —

Il morto non esala niente;

Caliamo il nostro morto in mare —

Il mare non gli volge pensiero.

.

Affonda, affonda o cadavere, ancora affonda,

Giù a fondo nello smisurato mare,

Dove vagano ignote forme in cerca di preda,

Giù a fondo, a fondo nello smisurato mare.

.

È notte lassù, e notte tutt’attorno,

E notte sarà con te;

Mentre tu affondi, tu affondi sissignore,

Più a fondo nello smisurato mare.

.

.

.

DIRGE

.

.

We drop our dead in the sea,

The bottomless, bottomless sea;

Each bubble a hollow sigh,

As it sinks forever and aye.

.

We drop our dead in the sea —

The dead reek not of aught;

We drop our dead in the sea —

The sea ne’er gives it a thought.

.

Sink, sink, oh corpse, still sink,

Far down in the bottomless sea,

Where the unknown forms do prowl,

Down, down in the bottomless sea.

.

‘Tis night above, and night all round,

And night will it be with thee;

As thou sinkest, and sinkest for aye,

Deeper down in the bottomless sea.

.

.

.

AURORA BOREALE

.

.

Quale potere disperde le luci settentrionali

Dietro il loro gioco d’acciaio?

Il solitario osservatore avverte il timore

Dalla potenza della natura,

Come quando apparendo,

Ha segnato il suo scatto scintillato

Nella fredda oscurità —

Ritiri e avanzamenti,

(Simile a un non volersi decidere del destino),

Metamorfosi e riprese di vigore,

E un raggio insanguinato.

.

Il dominus-fantasma si è smorzato del tutto,

Splendore e terrore andati

In presagio o promessa — e lascia filtrare

Il pallore, mite alba;

L’inizio del giorno, in corsa,

Come dentro una magnifica proiezione —

Come Dio,

Decretando e comandando

Le milioni di piccole lame che hanno irradiato,

Raccoglimento e dispersione —

Mezzanotte e mattino.

.

.

.

AURORA BOREALIS

.

.

What power disbands the Northern Lights

After their steely play?

The lonely watcher feels an awe

Of Nature’s sway,

As when appearing,

He marked their flashed uprearing

In the cold gloom —

Retreatings and advancings,

(Like dallyings of doom),

Transitions and enhancings,

And bloody ray.

.

The phantom-host has faded quite,

Splendor and Terror gone

Portent or promise — and gives way

To pale, meek Dawn;

The coming, going,

Alike in wonder showing —

Alike the God,

Decreeing and commanding

The million blades that glowed,

The muster and disbanding —

Midnight and Morn.

.

.

.

ATTRAVERSANDO I TROPICI

.

.

Mentre la Stella Polare tramonta alla vista

La Croce del Sud sale nel cielo;

Ma la perdita di te, amore mio, luce mia,

O sposa appena per una notte di nozze,

Nessuna gioia nascente potrà supplire.

.

Amore, amore, a poppa spingono gli alisei

E te, da te, ostinati portano via.

.

Di giorno l’azzurro e argenteo mare

E il tocco delle acque blandamente ventilate —

Né queste, né le stelle di Gama

Possono deliziarmi, giacché ancora

Ti desidero come Gama desiderava la terra.

.

Anelo, anelo, voltandomi indietro,

Il mio cuore scivola a poppa.

.

Quando, tagliati di sbieco dal nevischio, ci lanciamo

Dove infuria l’anno inverso del mondo,

Se le rose tutto al tuo portico s’attorcigliano,

Nondimeno il tuo cuore languirà per me

Che doppio l’ultimo avamposto desolato del mondo.

.

O amore, O amore, questi vasti oceani:

Amore, amore, è come se la morte vi fosse passata!

.

.

.

CROSSING THE TROPICS

.

.

While now the Pole Star sinks from sight

The Southern Cross it climbs the sky;

But losing thee, my love, my light,

O bride but for one bridal night,

The loss no rising joys supply.

.

Love, love, the Trade Winds urge abaft,

And thee, from thee, they steadfast waft.

.

By day the blue and silver sea

And chime of waters blandly fanned —

Nor these, nor Gama’s stars to me

May yield delight, since still for thee

I long as Gama longed for land.

.

I yearn, I yearn, reverting turn,

My heart it streams in wake astern.

.

When, cut by slanting sleet, we swoop

Where raves the world’s inverted year,

If roses all your porch shall loop,

Not less your heart for me will droop

Doubling the world’s last outpost drear.

.

O love, O love, these oceans vast:

Love, love, it is as death were past!

.

.

.

LE INVIDIABILI ISOLE

.

.

Nelle tempeste si raggiungono e dalle tempeste sono libere.

In lontananza, cupo è il tono che si scorge,

Ma da vicino è il verde; e sulla marga, il mare

Fa il tuono più basso e la nebbia di rugiada iridescente.

E, all’interno, dove il sonno piega le colline

Un sonno più pregno di sogni, istilla l’estasi di Dio —

Su caliginosi altopiani, in vorticose arie vaganti,

Palme che ondeggiano appena salutano il cipresso dell’amore

Sotto nella valle dove ruscelletti ciottolosi canticchiano

Una canzone per placare ogni dolore e gioia.

Muschio e felci vi sono in molte radure di qui,

Dove, sparsi in greggi, come miriadi di guance rosse riposano

Corrugati nel sogno — puri e semplici e inconsci dormienti,

Mentre senza fine le onde smuoiono sulle spiagge.

.

.

.

THE ENVIABLE ISLES.

.

.

Through storms you reach them and from storms are free.

Afar descried, the foremost drear in hue,

But, nearer, green; and, on the marge, the sea

Makes thunder low and mist of rainbowed dew.

But, inland, where the sleep that folds the hills

A dreamier sleep, the trance of God, instills —

On uplands hazed, in wandering airs aswoon,

Slow-swaying palms salute love’s cypress tree

Adown in vale where pebbly runlets croon

A song to lull all sorrow and all glee.

Sweet-fern and moss in many a glade are here,

Where, strown in flocks, what cheek-flushed myriads lie

Dimpling in dream — unconscious slumberers mere,

While billows endless round the beaches die.

.

.

.

IL PESCECANE DELLE MALDIVE

.

.

Attorno al pescecane, alquanto flemmatico,

Pallido bevitore del mar delle Maldive,

Il lucido piccolo pesce pilota, azzurro e slanciato,

Come sa essere vigile nell’attesa.

Dalla fossa sega della sua bocca, dall’ossario del suo stomaco,

Non hanno niente da temere,

E liquidamente scivolano lungo il suo orribile fianco

O davanti alla sua gorgonica testa;

O restano in agguato nel porto di denti seghettati

In triple bianche file di griglie scintillanti,

E lì trovano riparo quando il pericolo è là fuori,

Un asilo nelle fauci delle Parche!

Sono amici, e amichevolmente lo guidano alla preda,

Ma mai prendono parte al festino —

Occhi e cervella per quel rammollito letargico, stupido,

Pallido mangiatore di orribile carne.

.

.

.

THE MALDIVE SHARK

.

.

About the Shark, phlegmatical one,

Pale sot of the Maldive sea,

The sleek little pilot-fish, azure and slim,

How alert in attendance be.

From his saw-pit of mouth, from his charnel of maw,

They have nothing of harm to dread,

But liquidly glide on his ghastly flank

Or before his Gorgonian head;

Or lurk in the port of serrated teeth

In white triple tiers of glittering gates,

And there find a haven when peril’s abroad,

An asylum in jaws of the Fates!

They are friends; and friendly they guide him to prey,

Yet never partake of the treat —

Eyes and brains to the dotard lethargic and dull,

Pale ravener of horrible meat.

.

.

.

NOTTE DI MARCIA[1]

.

.

Con stendardi arrotolati e chiarine mute,

Un esercito sfila nella notte;

Elmi e lance scintillanti salutano

Il buio con la luce.

.

Nel silenzio profondo le legioni si spiegano,

Con file aperte, in ordine esatto;

Su pianure sconfinate scorrono e brillano —

Nessun capo in vista!

.

Lontano, in luccicante distanza perduta,

(Così dicono le leggende) si muove solitario,

E attraverso tutta quella brillante volta

Ancora invia il suo mandato.

.

.

.

THE NIGHT-MARCH

.

.

With banners furled, and clarions mute,

An army passes in the night;

And beaming spears and helms salute

The dark with bright.

.

In silence deep the legions stream,

With open ranks, in order true;

Over boundless plains they stream and gleam —

No chief in view!

.

Afar, in twinkling distance lost,

(So legends tell) he lonely wends

And back through all that shining host

His mandate sends.

.

.

.

MONODIA[2]

.

.

Averlo conosciuto, averlo amato

Dopo lunga solitudine;

E poi essersi estraniato nella vita,

E neppure a torto;

E ora la morte a fissare il sigillo.

Calmami, mia canzone, calmami un po’!

.

Dai poggi invernali il suo eremitico mucchio di terra,

Drappo coperto da cumuli nevosi,

E lì, senza casa, guizza l’uccello della neve

Sotto gli alberi d’abete:

Si glassa ora di ghiaccio la vite appartata

Che ha celato la più timida uva.

.

.

.

MONODY

.

.

To have known him, to have loved him

After loneness long;

And then to be estranged in life,

And neither in the wrong;

And now for death to set his seal —

Ease me, a little ease, my song!

.

By wintry hills his hermit-mound

The sheeted snow-drifts drape,

And houseless there the snow-bird flits

Beneath the fir-trees’ crape:

Glazed now with ice the cloistral vine

That hid the shyest grape.

.

.

AL CAPITANO DEL METEOR

.

.

Solo sull’abisso più sperduto della terra,

Marinaio! che fai una vigile veglia —

Al largo di Capo delle Tempeste[3]

Su onde mostruose che s’arricciano e s’infrangono;

A te pensiamo quando qui dalla sponda

Soffiamo l’idromele nella ribollente schiuma.

.

A te pensiamo, adunati in cerchio;

Al tosatore del vello dell’oceano brindiamo,

E al Meteor che volge a casa.

.

.

.

TO THE MASTER OF THE METEOR

.

.

Lonesome on earth’s loneliest deep,

Sailor! who dost thy vigil keep —

Off the Cape of Storms dost musing sweep

Over monstrous waves that curl and comb;

Of thee we think when here from brink

We blow the mead in bubbling foam.

.

Of thee we think, in a ring we link;

To the shearer of ocean’s fleece we drink,

And the Meteor rolling home.

.

.

(traduzione di Emilio Capaccio)

  1. L’oggetto della poesia è il cielo stellato.

  2. Componimento dedicato a Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864).

  3. ‘Capo di Buona Speranza’ fu originariamente chiamato ‘Capo delle Tempeste’ dal navigatore portoghese che per prima vi approdò, ovvero: Bortolomeo Diaz (1450-1500), nel 1487. Il re Giovanni II del Portogallo (1455-1495) lo ribattezzò Cabo da Boa Esperança, che significa, letteralmente, ‘Capo di Buona Speranza’.

Similar Posts:

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Lascia un commento

Il tuo indirizzo email non sarà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *

*

code

Questo sito usa Akismet per ridurre lo spam. Scopri come i tuoi dati vengono elaborati.